Scholarly articles on speed dating

To test this, they had more than 300 undergraduates participate in speed-dating events.In half of those events, participants engaged in the standard speed-dating procedure of men circulating while women stayed in one place.The ability of self-perpetuating boards to develop a strong board culture may also increase the risk of becoming too insular and unresponsive.Speed dating events like Board Match can help self-perpetuating boards meet and recruit candidates they would never otherwise have considered.Such events may also help combat some of the leadership challenges of running a self-perpetuating (or self-nominating) board.Self-perpetuating boards are tempted to recruit new board members from amongst their friends and colleagues and thereby run the risk of becoming unrepresentative of the target population and service area.In other words, when lots of potential suitors are approaching you, it makes sense to be picky.This brings up a much broader point: it is all too easy to assume that men and women behave very differently because of evolved, inborn differences.

That is because we have what psychologists call “behavioural scripts”, or a sequence of events that we typically expect to occur in social situations.

Men may be less picky not because they are men, but because societal norms require them to do the majority of the approaching in dating scenarios.

Women’s selectivity, meanwhile, might arise from their essentially arbitrary role as “selectors”.

But since many nonprofits still struggle to find effective board members, this idea may be worth expanding. When the Board Match event was initiated in 2005, only a few hundred potential board members were in attendance.

Now, with more than a thousand candidates present, many of the nonprofits return year after year to meet and recruit new directors.

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