Scene from chatterly

He laid his hand on her shoulder, and softly, gently, it began to travel down the curve of her back, blindly, with a blind stroking motion, to the curve of her crouching loins.

And there his hand softly, softly, stroked the curve of her flank, in the blind instinctive caress. And closing his hand softly on her upper arm, he drew her up and led her slowly to the hut, not letting go of her till she was inside.

The hand stroked her face softly, softly, with infinite soothing and assurance, and at last there was the soft touch of a kiss on her cheek.

She lay quite still, in a sort of sleep, in a sort of dream.

Without knowing, he came quickly towards her and crouched beside her again, taking the chick from her hands, because she was afraid of the hen, and putting it back in the coop.It is an account of the obscenity trial surrounding the publication of Lady Chatterley's Lover in 1960.Written by Andrew Davies and directed by James Hawes, it draws heavily, and accurately, on the court reporter's notes (published by Penguin as The Trial of Lady Chatterley) for scenes that take place within the courtroom but also presents entirely fictitious scenes involving the deliberations of jury members.He drew down the thin silk sheath, slowly, carefully, right down and over her feet. He lay there with his arms round her, his body on hers, his wet body touching hers, so close. Then with a quiver of exquisite pleasure he touched the warm soft body, and touched her navel for a moment in a kiss. And he had to come in to her at once, to enter the peace on earth of her soft, quiescent body. It was the moment of pure peace for him, the entry into the body of the woman. With a queer obedience, she lay down on the blanket.Then she felt the soft, groping, helplessly desirous hand touching her body, feeling for her face.The script chooses to invert the novel's central conceit by showing a relationship between a worldly woman and a naive man, rather than the other way around.Also portrayed are numerous real-life participants in the trial, such as judge Mr Justice Byrne (played here by Karl Johnson), prosecutor Mervyn Griffith-Jones (Pip Torrens), defence lawyer Gerald Gardiner (Donald Sumpter) and sociologist Richard Hoggart (David Tennant).

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One thought on “Scene from chatterly”

  1. It's really important we be as supportive as we can; we have to go to work, because we'll get sued if we don't show up, but when I'm not working, I'm on the picket line. Probably the studios already know how much they're willing to pay, but they want to make everyone crawl across glass naked for it.